• Learn how to reattach sternum strap on your f-stop legacy or classic Mountain Series pack.

    If your sternum strap was snagged and become detached from your legacy or classic Mountain Series pack, reattachment is simple, easy and secure.

    All you need to do is follow these simple steps to get you ready for your next adventure:

    1. Make sure that your strap/buckle is facing outwards from the pack

    2. Position the sternum strap attachment point against the rail on your shoulder strap at around a 45 degree angle and push towards the rail

    3. Wiggle the sternum strap attachment point as you push in a downward motion. This will encourage the attachment point to wiggle onto the rail.

    4. Keep pushing and wiggling until the attachment point is firmly on the rail. That's it. You're ready to get back out there.

    Remember: Enjoy the Journey. Be safe. Keep telling stories!

    Note: This applies to legacy or classic series f-stop Mountain Series camera packs such as the Lotus, Ajna, Tilopa, Sukha and Shinn.


    In outdoor sports photography, being prepared is not just about skill, creativity and having the right gear. It's also as much about your level of organization and how you pack. Join us as we explore the world of Pro Photographer and f-stop Ambassador Frien Harald Wisthaler, as he navigates the demanding and exhilarating world of the Ski-Cross World Cup in Ineichen. 

    Nestled in the Dolomites, Harald's home in Italy (South Tyrol) offers the perfect canvas for his 15-year photographic journey. His latest challenge?  Only capturing the high-speed action and raw emotion at the Ski-Cross World Cup. 

    The Gear:
    The toolkit at Harald's disposal is as diverse as the sport itself. With his Mirrorless Nikon camera bodies, his range of lenses from wide-angle to super telephoto lens sets, alongside protective gear and outdoor wear, he geared up for a vast range of shooting situations. But it's not just about having the right gear; it's about knowing how to pack it. Harald emphasizes the importance of being consistently organized, but also flexible, often changing the equipment he packs based on the day's conditions and location scouting insights.  

    Proper Preparation: Harald told us that his number 1 tip is to not only make yourself familiar with your camera and lenses but also get to know the features of your bags. Look at all pockets and ask yourself why these are there and for what scenario you can use them for yourself! Make the gear yours and really get to know the equipment you're working with. This will help you work smarter and faster in almost every aspect when you're in the field and will make dealing with issues and obstacles a breeze. 

    OV German - Turn on the Captions for English translation

    Overcoming On-Site Challenges

    In the fast-paced world of sports photography, being prepared and flexible is just as important as having a keen eye for the shot. At the Ski-Cross World-cup, Harald faces unique challenges. His Office is situated just next to the ski slope, which for him has its pros and cons: He is always right in the middle of everything, no matter what.  

    To shoot an event like this effectively, you must always be ready to go, constantly aware of the schedules and factoring in the time you need to get up and down the slopes; and of course, adjust to the weather. When the race starts, everything is finished in 50 minutes. Choosing the right spot to bed in is crucial. Getting the shots you need requires strategic planning and sometimes a bit of luck. You need to be aware that moving positions during races is often not feasible and you cannot cross the race areas, so choose your position based on your goals.  

    Be Prepared

    Harald's passion for photography stems from far more than simply clicking the shutter.  The journey to each shoot is just as important to him. Whether it's World Cup events or serene mountain vistas, Harald knows that each adventure starts with a well-packed bag. Harald swears by his f-stop Tilopa DuraDiamond® 50l pack, a reliable companion on all his escapades.

    The key, he says, is consistency and preparedness. He packs the same way every time depending on the situation, ensuring he can find everything in a flash - be it his trusty 50mm lens or a crucial first aid kit. By keeping his pack consistently organized, ensuring he can quickly grab the right lens for the shot without a second thought. His advice? Keep your setup routine and familiar, so you're always ready, regardless of the conditions or the rush. 

    Pack Like a Pro: 5 Core Principles

    1. Adaptive Gear Choices Based on Location Scouting: Prior to each shoot, Harald conducts thorough location scouting. Based on these observations, he adapts his equipment to his needs. Sometimes that means making last-minute changes between wide-angle and telephoto lenses to suit the specific needs of the shooting environment. 
    2. Strategic Use of Accessory Pouches: Harald utilizes accessory pouches as a methodical approach to organization. He assigns specific items like batteries and memory cards to designated pouches. This strategic placement allows for efficient retrieval, especially in time sensitive scenarios. 
    3. Be Ready for the Elements: Acknowledging the unpredictability of outdoor environments, Harald prepares for a range of conditions. His gear includes protective items like rain covers for wet weather and thermal clothing for colder climates. This ensures both he and his equipment are shielded from the elements. 
    4. Be Consistent With Your Organization: Harald maintains a consistent setup for his pack, which is crucial for high-pressure shoots. This consistency in organization means he knows exactly where each piece of equipment is, from camera bodies to lenses. Reducing the time spent searching for items in the field means he can focus on getting the shot.
    5. Pack for Diverse Photographic Conditions: Emphasizing the need for versatility, Harald packs equipment that can handle a variety of conditions. His approach involves selecting the right gear for the job, also ensuring that he has backup gear and essentials like lens cleaners and protective covers. 

    A Strategy for Every Shoot: Whether travelling by car or tackling unpredictable terrain on foot, Harald appreciates the versatility of his f-stop Camera Inserts. They allow him to switch lenses, gear and setups quickly, adapting to changing scenes and moments. This flexibility is crucial, especially when pre-event scouting isn't an option. He usually brings a second Camera Insert with him in the car filled with potential other lenses he might need. Depending on what the location offers, he has the option to adapt and get the best outcomes.

    The Gear

    Harald utilizes a variety of equipment when he is out in the field. On this shoot he brought following gear with him:

    Learned Wisdom: The devil is in the details – or in this case, in the packing. Harald keeps his bag organized the same way regardless of the shoot, which makes adapting on the go a breeze. His approach is to make every slot and pocket useful to him! He also has a few more tricks up his sleeve. Also, he’s a firm believer in packing the little extras that you might not need. You never know when that ‘just in case’ item becomes a lifesaver.   

    The Final Day

    On the final day, the weather closed in. Ineichen offers a stunning mountainous backdrop, but with snow coming in, Harald had to adjust his approach. Instead of isolating individual participants with his telephoto lenses, he adapted to shooting on a wider field of view. He then incorporated long exposure to highlight the dumping of snow and the speed of the race. Finding a darker background and panning his camera with the subject helped Harald make the most of the situation and produce his usual exceptional standard of work.  


    Stay flexible, stay responsive, and prepared to adapt at a moment's notice.

    Harald Wisthaler

    This is what you need to know about our camera packs! We give you an overview of what really matters in the Design or Functionality of the f-stop System. Furthermore, we give an outline of what thoughts go into building this f-stop System, designing our packs, the build, the carrying system, and most importantly, the modular design of f-stop Packs. This article focuses on providing an Overview to better understand

    What you need to know about the f-stop System

    A camera backpack needs to be tailored to the needs of photographers. Everyone has different gear, scenarios and where they bring the gear.

    Photographers are no strangers to the ever-evolving world of camera gear. The need to carry various lenses, camera bodies, accessories, and sometimes even drones has led to a demand for camera bags that offer both protection and organization. Since its founding, f-stop has specialized in providing technical camera bags for serious visual storytellers with flexible camera insert arrangements. f-stop is known for its rugged build, comfortable carrying system, and, most importantly, the modular system. As a result, the f-stop System allows users to customize their packs to their exact specifications.

    We have more articles diving into the Camera Inserts or also the Differences between the packs so make sure to check out our blog for more.

    How to pick the right pack for your needs

    It really comes down to understanding your needs first and the purpose your pack needs to fulfill. As an outline, the f-stop System consists of the pack itself and then furthermore the Camera Insert which is actually the heart of the Setup. The main purpose the pack needs to fulfill is to carry and protect your camera of course! After all, we have a range of sizes and styles of packs and Inserts to cater to different preferences and gear requirements. Whether you need a compact daypack for a short hike, a big backpack for an extended photo expedition, or Cine gear.

    A few points to keep in mind:

    Additional important questions you would need to answer yourself are:

    When you answer these questions you are on the best track to finding your perfect setup.

    Graphic showing the process of selecting a camera pack,

    The Design of Our Camera packs

    Overview of the Construction and Build

    Since f-stop Camera Packs and Bags are technical Camera Carry solutions they are designed with high durability and rugged construction to last for years. Following this mindset, we design and develop all of the packs packed with practical features that make it a highly advanced tool for your equipment to withstand the demands of outdoor photography. All the following points make the packs ideal for photographers who venture into challenging environments

    • Technical design and weather resistance
      From Water-resistant materials, welded seams (to avoid perforation through stitching), and reinforced weather-resistant Zippers. Additionally, we include numerous useful features like for example the drainage hole on the bottom of the front pocket to let moisture out. All things considered, the technical design aspects ensure that your gear stays protected even in adverse weather conditions.
    • Comfortable Carrying System
      First and foremost, the backpack-style design of f-stop Camera Packs prioritizes comfort during long hikes or photo expeditions. In order to ensure the best weight distribution, all Mountain series packs come with an Aluminium frame. Padded shoulder straps, a ventilated back panel, and adjustable chest and waist straps distribute the weight of the bag evenly. This is crucial to reduce fatigue.
    • Rear Access Points:
      Evidently, f-stop Camera Packs feature a rear access point to the main compartment. This facilitates quick and convenient access to your camera gear and keeping it safe.
      To point out the top two advantages of having a bag panel access to your camera gear are first and foremost protection against the elements and secondly safety.
      • The bag will lie on the front ( when on the ground ) so you have access to the main compartment therefore it will stay clean.
      • While you have the bag on your back, you will easily notice any attempt by someone to access your camera without your permission.
    • A Modular Camera Insert System
      One of the standout features of f-stop Camera Packs is the modular camera insert system. The heart of this system is the Internal Camera Unit (ICU). The Camera Unit is a padded customizable insert that can be easily swapped between different f-stop bags. The Camera Insert comes in various sizes to accommodate different camera setups ranging from mirrorless cameras to professional DSLRs and even cinema cameras. The adjustable dividers within the Camera Insert allow photographers to create custom compartments for their camera bodies, lenses, and accessories. The modularity of the Camera Inserts allows users to adapt their bags to various shooting scenarios.

    Other Design Features

    • Customizable Exterior
      f-stop packs come with various attachment points for our Gatekeeper Straps. Therefore this customization allows visual storytellers to tailor their packs to their specific needs. You can extend the carry load if needed and carry additional items like tripods, water bottles, or trekking poles. On top of that, you can add accessories to the outside of the pack with the featured Mollee System on the Mountain Series Hip-belt.
    • Accessories
      Our variety of accessories are designed to complement your camera pack which also helps to enhance organization and protection for lenses, drones, and small accessories. We offer Gadgets like a Dronecase, Packing Cell Kit, Accessory Pouches, and more.
    • Hydration Compatibility
      Moreover, f-stop packs are designed to accommodate hydration reservoirs, making them suitable for both photography and outdoor activities. In all our Mountain series or Ultralight series, you'll find a Multipurpose sleeve to hold a Water bladder. Look for the Hyperloon lash with H2O written on it. This is intended for a Water bladder Tube to go through. Aside from this, some of our packs feature Mesh Side pockets to carry a water bottle on the outside of your pack. Packs with the Mesh Side pocket are the Kashmir, Loka, Ajna, or Shinn. Each pack has a Side or front pocket to fit a Nalgene bottle.

    Conclusion

    Whether you're a landscape photographer, a wildlife enthusiast, or a documentary filmmaker, f-stop's modular system allows you to protect and organize your gear efficiently. As the world of photography continues to evolve, we offer you a trusted companion for visual storytellers and photographers who demand flexibility and functionality from their camera bags.

    If you need advice or have questions please do not hesitate to reach out! We are here to help


    Recent Posts:

    Need further help or assistance?

    How would you carry all of your camera gear plus a lot of camping gear? You might do what f-stop Ambassador Pia Steen does when she wants to pack camera gear and camping gear. She loads up her Shinn 80L DuraDiamond® with everything from cine setups to long lenses.

    “If I sometimes just need that little extra space I have it and don't need to worry” 

    Intro

    One of Pia’s passions is landscape photography which requires a lot of planning, time, and patience. Pia is often on multiple day tours and workshops. So she needs a pack with the capacity to carry EVERYTHING for several days, including clothing, a jacket, a sleeping bag, a camping stove, food, etc.  Then, when planning short hikes away from camp and plan, Pia unpacks, reorganizes and just takes the essentials for that day’s hike.

    Nature has always been an important and big part of her life. Pia has used f-stop for over a decade and uses multiple Packs - each one for a different purpose! However, the Shinn is a pack she regularly chooses over her Tilopa 50L DuraDiamond® for trips or excursions.  . 

    Pia Steen with the Packing Cell Kit and Camping Kit
    Pia Steen with the Packing Cell Kit and Camping Kit next to her the Shinn DuraDiamond

    One of Pia's mottos to get the best light is "Better to be two hours too early than just two minutes late". She has been using f-stop for more than 10 years now and her newest addition is the Shinn 80L DuraDiamond® ⁠
    Today, she brings all with her that she would need to wait for the perfect light. She pulls out her stove and boils water to make some tea while watching the day’s light develop.

    “The emotionality of every moment is like a breath of life. Creating a memory from that ephemeral is a gift.” ​ 

    Pia’s Kit

    The Shinn 80L DuraDiamond® might be designed to accommodate cinema gear, but its biggest strength is its versatility, which Pia takes full advantage of. She utilizes the Shinn’s spacious capacity and all-day comfort on her multi-day hikes and workshops. "Better to be two hours too early, than just two minutes late" she laughs.

    Often running multi-day tours and workshops, Pia needs a pack with the capacity to carry everything for several days. This often includes a change of clothing, a jacket, a sleeping bag, a camping stove, and food, all packed alongside her photography gear.

    The usual ”Landscape Outdoor Kit":

    For her multi-day trips or Landscape Photography where she is expecting to carry more than usual, she is using the Shinn 80L Duradiamond® to give her enough space for a sleeping bag, sleeping pad, Bivy Tent, food, etc. 
    On this occasion she used the Shinn 80 L along with the Slope Medium Camera Insert which gives her additional room to fill with camping Gear from Stove, Gas, and cups in her Packing Cell KitAside from this, she brought a small box of Cookies (or other snacks) Tripod ( attached to the front of the pack with Gatekeepers), Gloves, a Down Jacket, Memory Cards, a Card Reader, a Cleaning Kit, Batteries and an f-stop Accessory Pouch Small and Accessory Pouch Medium.

    f-stop Shinn 80L DuraDiamond®  camera backpack and the f-stop Pro Small Camera Insert
    Pia with the Shinn 80L DuraDiamond® with the Slope Medium Camera Insert 

    Tip's from Pia: 

    The Shinn DuraDiamond 80 L with the XLarge Insert and the Medium Slope on the side
    the Shinn 80L DuraDiamond® filled with the Pro XLarge Camera Insert and the Medium Slope Camera Insert next to the bag. See more f-stop Camera Inserts

    Whether you pack a Shinn 80L DuraDiamond® like Pia or a smaller Mountain Series backpack, you will find multiple attachment points across the entire Mountain Series range. ⁠ One of the things that Pia loves about her Shinn and our other Mountain Series packs is the multiple attachment points, which can be used to carry and attach larger items such as sleeping bags and tents to the packs. 

    Join us as our Ambassadors share tips and tricks they have learned over years of traveling, with Life on the Dāsh, and check out how fellow Ambassadors get organized.

    Words and photos by Alex Grymanis

    Three Snowboarders with bag packs and Snowboard attached to the pack at sunset

    Snowboard photographers traverse the globe following the best riders and searching for the most epic snow conditions in far-flung locations. However, sometimes the most meaningful experiences can be found closer to home, as f-stop Ambassador Alex Grymanis found. He explored the beautiful landscapes of Northern Greece through snowboarding.

    Greece might not be the first place that springs to mind for snowboarding, but for Alex, the trip gave him the chance to hit the road with close friends and re-experience what made them fall in love with snowboarding and adventure. 

    This trip taught us that we can achieve anything as long as we have the will and the aspiration to do our thing and we do hope that it will inspire you to do the same. 

    Alex Grymanis
    ALEX GRYMANIS

    Introduction

    Last February, almost a year ago, I traveled through northern Greece. This trip started with a few friends, in an RV, for 10 days in search of snow and new places in our country, Greece, where we could snowboard.  The fact is that it came to be a trip about creativity, relaxing, and being once again carefree. During these 10 days not only did we become children again and remember the feeling of being away from the concrete and loud city, but we also learned how to coexist in a small, confined space and we reconnected with nature.

    Now that a year has passed by, a book, a video, and these photographs keep that trip alive in our memory and make it possible to share this experience with you.

    Chapter I

    Hospitality

    Everything seems fun and normal until you wake up the first morning surrounded by snow and by your friends all in a tiny four-wheeled house. The sweet lullaby from the wind and the sound of the trees at night become your guide and sooner or later you realize that you need to adapt to this new environment along with all of your gear, cameras, and wardrobe along with its frustrations. You learn to respect other people’s privacy, needs, and weirdness and start working together as a team. In places without electricity and no internet, the real connection between you, your friends, and the people you meet happens.

    Chapter II

    Search

    Growing up and having to work more to make your living, tends to shift your mind away from the things that you really love and make you feel happy and free. The deeper search in locations already known wakes up that feeling of rebirth and connection with the mountain. We got blessed with a heavy snowfall in Vasilitsa in the middle of the trip and decided to explore the “already known” slopes but from a different angle.

    Chapter III

    Perspective

    Snoozing the alarm was our biggest fear for that night’s mission. It was the coldest night of the trip but at the same time the most beautiful of them all. The sky was clear and full of stars so bright that it seemed we were walking on the moon. Our motivation for the hike soon became stronger and we made it to the peak slightly earlier than expected. After a short rest, we strapped in our boards on the backpacks with Gatekeeper Straps and when the first sun ray hit the slope we dropped into the line that would shift our perspectives of snowboarding forever.

    Chapter IV

    Down days

    Making every day count was the main idea since day one. Downdays came with heavy rain on the mountains and it was time for us to hit the road. On the way to Metsovo, we made a 180-degree turn and drove even further north to the Prespese Lakes. We got to experience the life of local fishermen and saw farmers burning their fields to prepare them for the following season in a place that stood out from the rest of the trip. Needless to say, we had the best feast on the whole trip.


    Recent Posts:

    Ever since his first skydive, f-stop Staff Pro Jesper Grønnemark had the idea of doing a photo shoot while in the air. This is how it went. Even though as he says, his first skydive was more than enough for him, this idea remained stuck in his mind. 

    The idea became a reality when Jesper teamed up with the guys from Flux Freefly, gave them a Profoto B1X, and jumped out of an airplane at 13,200 feet to take his photography to new heights.

    THE RUSH

    His heart is racing, adrenaline is gushing into his veins as the door of the airplane opens. 13.200 ft. (4 km) under him the ground stares back. This is it, one chance, one shot. His grip on the Sony A7R II tightens as they move out the side of the plane, 45 seconds of free fall awaits, 3, 2, 1…

    FLUX: Benjamiin Laudrup, Jacob Lundsgaard Madsen and Emil Landeværn Kristensen; Head of the project: Michael Boe Laigaard; Lights: Profoto; Camera equipment: Sony Nordic; Video: Kasper Sveistrup - Frame2film; Graphics: Niels Borup - Saftig; Article: Kira Andersen; Pilot: Fillip Højlund Aarhus skydive club Red Bull Denmark

    THE BOUNDARIES OF PHOTOGRAPHY WHEN SKYDIVING

    The eternal strive to push the boundaries of what people believe is possible in sports photography has put Jesper Grønnemark in a position he did not imagine himself in again. After his first skydiving experience, some years ago, it wasn´t an immediate love story. Now, here he is again on account of his own creative thinking. Why would he do it again you might ask. Well, the answer is, he needs to. In order to push those boundaries, he is more than willing to put himself in extreme situations.

    When trying to capture the emotions of a skydiving experience, safe is not part of the vocabulary.

    Jesper Gronnemark

    THE PLAN, AND THEN A CHANGE OF PLANS

    How do you make it happen then? In short, you need a man with a plan, and that man was Michael Boe Laigaard, head of the project in terms of finding the right people, and those people came in the form of the Danish national team in free fly - FLUX.

    They are the best when it comes to jumping out of planes and falling controlled through the air. The original plan was that they would all have their parachutes out, Jesper with the camera and Benjamiin with the Profoto B1X flash. It would have been easier to track the skydiver, or Mr. Bill as the “model” is called in skydiving, through the air. However, shortly before the jump, it was deemed too dangerous due to wind and the plan changed to free fall. This new challenge was going to put an even greater demand on Jesper's skills as a sports photographer since they only had one jump and now had to nail the shot in a fall going 200 km/h.

    Skydiver Benjamin from Flux at Sunset with a Profoto B1X Flash photographed by Jasper Gronnemark

    Benjamiin with the Profoto B1X flash

    THE FALL

    GO! As Jesper is falling through the air, he sees the skydiver approaching from above, he gets his camera in place and suddenly he is cool, calm, and collected. The workflow is such an integrated part of him, that even in a time like this, it overthrows the adrenaline rush. Furthermore, he only has one shot, so he better make it count! The skydiver is head down, shots are fired, and not long after it parachutes out and a touchdown. Fingers are crossed on all parts. How did it turn out?

    Skydiver Emil from FLUX in the air heads down at Sunset photographed by Jesper Gronnemark

    Emil approaches and gets into position for the desired skydiving photo

    I only have one Shot, One Jump..and that's it. Once I got my camera to my face while flying through the air at 200 km/h, I was focused. There was no sound, no sense of falling and I didn't feel @michaelboelaigaard on my back.
    My only mission was to get the shot!

    Jesper Grønnemark

    THE FINAL RESULT

    Once again Jesper proves that hard work and quite a bit of sacrifice pays off. A lot of planning went into this shoot and even so, they changed. However, it was for the best. Jesper got the image he originally envisioned! A man hanging in the air above the clouds, head down. It feels as if it would be safer if his head was up, but when trying to capture the emotions of a skydiving experience, safe is not part of the vocabulary.

    Skydiver Emil from FLUX heads down above the clouds at Sunset

    Skydiver Emil from FLUX heads down above the clouds at Sunset
    Shot with Sony a7r II | Sony 24-70mm f/2.8 GM | Profoto B1X | SHUTTER SPEED: 1/1600, APERTURE: 10.0, ISO: 640

    The Skydiving Team

    Three Skydivers from FLUX with an Airplane in the background, f-stop Ambassador Jesper Gronnemark

    The Skydiving Team from FLUX; From Left to right: Jacob, Benjamiin, Emil

    Benjamiin was the one holding the Profoto B1X at the free fall at Jesper's skydiving shoot. It isn’t normal to skydive with anything in your hands, but Benjamiin is an experienced guy, who already tried skydiving with fishing nets, fruits, and other crazy stuff

    Portrait of skydiver Jacob from FLUX infant of skydiving plain

    Jacob's role is to film Emil and Benjamiin from a close distance using a helmet-mounted camera while they perform. He usually does that by being flat in the air with his back facing the ground. He was also the one filming me from the air for the behind-the-scenes video for my skydiving shoot.

    Portrait of Skydiver Emil from FLUX in the Door of the Airplane

    Emil was the athlete in front of the lens at Jesper's skydiving shoot. Emil recommended shooting him while he is doing a trick easily described as a front layout from the belly - a reversed Jesus rising to heaven. Jesper loved the idea because it starts a lot of thoughts at the one looking at the image when a guy is flying head first towards the ground.

    EXPLORE THE f-stop GEAR JESPER GRONNEMARK IS USING:

    Portrait of Jesper Gronnemark with the Tilopa 50L DuraDiamond® Cypress opening bag panel of camera pack

    Jesper Grønnemark

    http://www.gronne.dk

    Jesper Grønnemark is renowned for his innovative approach to adventure and action sports photography, redefining the genre's conventional boundaries. See more of Jesper's work!



    Recent Posts:

    linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram